Medical School Requirements in Ontario

Discussion Forum: http://www.premed101.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=3

1. UOT

Undergraduate Applicants Minimum requirements:

  • at least 3 years of study towards a Canadian university bachelor’s degree in any discipline (equivalent of 15 credits)
  • minimum GPA of 3.6 / 4.0 on the OMSAS scale
  • minimum MCAT scores of 9 in each section and N on the Writing Sample
  • applicants educated outside of Canada must complete the equivalent of a Canadian four-year university bachelor’s degree (please see the section for International Applicants)

Prerequisites:

  • two full-course equivalents (FCE) in any life science
  • one FCE in any of social sciences, humanities, or a language 

General Information

Students attending a Canadian university taking programs leading to degrees in any discipline (e.g., Arts, Engineering, Pharmacy, Science, etc.) may apply for admission during the third or higher years of university study provided they have fulfilled the prerequisite course requirements. 

Undergraduate academic achievement is assessed through MCAT scores and GPA. The coherence and rigour of the program of study, and the relative standing of the applicant in that program, where available, will be assessed in the interpretation of GPA. Prospective applicants are encouraged to pursue challenging and rigourous courses of study, as this will not jeopardize their chance of successful application. Applicants are expected to have taken courses at a level corresponding with the year of their program. For example, a student who applies for admission while registered in the third year of undergraduate work should have at least three third-year or higher courses in his/her program.  Applicants in the fourth year of their program should be enrolled in a majority of courses at the third- and fourth-year levels.

The calculated grade point average used to fulfill the academic requirement will not include the candidate’s current year of study, as this information is not available to us during the application period.

All applicants are asked to explain their choice of undergraduate study in their personal statement. Applicants who are not following a prescribed program are required to submit an explanation and focus of their chosen program. Applicants registered in cooperative programs are advised to submit a separate letter detailing the schedule of their academic and work terms, if this information is not clear from their transcript.

Students applying in the final year of a three- or four-year degree program must complete the degree requirements and provide proof of completion prior to the date of enrolment. Students applying in the third year of a four-year degree program must provide proof that they have completed the requirements of that year of their degree prior to the date of enrolment in the medical program.

NOTE: Applicants accepted from the third year of a four-year degree program will not be considered for deferred admission.  The decision whether or not to first complete one’s undergraduate degree should be carefully considered before application to medical school is made.

Non-Academic acheivements are assessed through the personal essay, autobiographical sketch, and reference letters.

2. McMaster

sources from http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/mdprog/academic_requirements.html

Academic Requirements

Applicants must report on the OMSAS Academic Record Form all grades received in the undergraduate credit courses in which they have ever registered. Failure to report courses, programs or grades on the OMSAS Academic Record Form will result in the disqualification of the application. All grades are converted by the applicant on the Academic Record Form to a 4.00 scale according to the OMSAS Undergraduate Grading System Conversion Table. (The Conversion Table is provided with the OMSAS Application.)There are four absolute requirements for eligibility to apply to the program:

  • By May 2012, applicants must have completed a minimum of three years of undergraduate degree level work (30 half year credits or 15 full year credits or a combination). There is no requirement that applicants carry a full course load. Applicants who do not have 30 credits complete at the time of application must submit their final undergraduate transcript with course codes and grades to McMaster by June 30, 2012 as evidence that this requirement has been met;
  • By October 3, 2011 applicants must have achieved an overall OMSAS converted average of 3.00 on the 4.00 point scale.
  • All applicants to the MD Program are required to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) prior to the deadline date of October 3rd and must release their scores to OMSAS by October 11th. The score from the Verbal Reasoning section of the MCAT will be used in both formulae (offer of interview and advancement to Collation). A minimum score of 6 on the Verbal Reasoning component is required. The Physical Sciences, Biological Sciences and Writing Sample scores will not be considered in the selection process. MCAT test results will be accepted provided the test was written no more than five years prior to the application deadline. The most recent test result will be used for those applicants who attempt the MCAT more than once. For information on the MCAT, click here.
  • On Wednesday, October 19, 2011 or Sunday, October 23, 2011, all applicants to the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University will be required to complete a 90 minute computer-based test, called CASPer, as part of the selection process. CASPer, the Computer-based Assessment for Sampling Personal characteristics, is a web-based assessment of interpersonal skills and decision-making, to be completed at a computer.  Successful completion of CASPer is required to maintain applicant eligibility.

No other aspects of the application will be considered if these requirements are not met.

***

Please note: Only degree courses taken at an accredited university will be considered. To satisfy the minimum requirements, academic credentials from a Canadian University must be from an institution that is a full member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) or the Council of Ontario Universities (COU).

An applicant who has completed a diploma at a CEGEP (Province of Quebec) must have completed by May, 2012 at least two additional years (20 half year credits) of degree credit work at an accredited university.

Applicants who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for a baccalaureate degree in less than three years by the time of the application deadline, and who meet the “3.00” average requirement, are also eligible.

An overall simple average will be calculated using the grades from all undergraduate degree level courses ever taken (with the exception of credits taken on exchange outside of Canada/USA). Work of different years is treated equally. This average is calculated by the applicant on the OMSAS Academic Record Form and verified on the OMSAS Verification Report which is sent to applicants. McMaster University may also review and revise this average. The marks from supplementary and summer courses will be included in the GPA calculation. Courses for which a “Pass” grade is assigned are counted for credit, but will not be included in the GPA calculation. In order for the GPA to be evaluated, independent grades from a minimum of 5 half-year or 5 full-year courses are required, without which the application will not be considered.

3. University of Western Ontario

Admissions Requirements

Abstract from http://www.schulich.uwo.ca/admissions/medicine/requirements

The following are requirements for admission in Fall 2011.  Please note that the admission policy is reviewed annually and the admission requirements from previous years may not apply.  The University reserves the right to review and change the admission requirements at any time, without notice.Applicants to the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry’s Undergraduate MD program are considered on a number of levels.  The first review of applicant information takes into account the candidate’s academic history and performance: completion of honours degree; GPA in 2 best years; and MCAT scores. 

For applicants from outside Southwestern Ontario, the MCAT minimums for the 2010-11 application cycle are as follows:

Biological Sciences:   10

Physical Sciences:       9

Verbal Reasoning:     11

Writing Sample:         P

The minimum GPA is 3.70

Some flexibility is given to applicants from Southwestern Ontario. In the 2010-11 application cycle, a minimum score of 8 in any one section of the MCAT is acceptable as long as the combined score for Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Verbal Reasoning is 30 or more. The minimum score for the Writing Sample is O.

The minimum GPA is 3.7 as for applicants outside Southwestern Ontario.

Admission to the Doctor of Medicine Program is highly competitive and possessing the minimum requirements does not ensure an interview or offer of admission. 

4. University of Ottawa

source from http://www.med.uottawa.ca/Students/MD/Admissions/eng/eligibility_criteria.html

Eligibility Criteria

Applications will be accepted from students in good standing who will have successfully completed, prior to the beginning of June preceding registration, in a recognized university, three years of full-time studies (five full-year course/year) in any undergraduate program leading to a bachelor’s degree, including four specific prerequisite courses: 1. one full year course (or two semester courses) in General Biology including laboratory session; 2. one full year course in Humanities or Social Sciences (or two semester courses in separate disciplines; 3. and 4. the equivalent of two full-year courses (or four semester courses) of the following Chemistry courses: i) General Biochemistry without laboratory session; ii) General Chemistry with laboratory session; iii) Organic Chemistry with laboratory session.

A full-time academic year where the equivalent of four (4) full-year courses is taken is accepted and counted in the WGPA calculation only if the missing course/credit is completed either as an additional course within another academic year or as a summer course. Individual courses taken during a summer session are accepted for the credit value in this instance however the mark obtained is not counted in the calculation of the WGPA. Any year with less than four full-year courses will not count as a full-time year of study. A full-time summer semester does not replace a semester of studies within an academic year.

Candidates are allowed to complete missing prerequisite courses during the academic year preceding admission but, as with all courses, not during the summer before their registration in the MD program of studies.

The description of the prerequisite sciences courses offered at the University of Ottawa can be found in the last step of the eligibility requirements.

The Faculty of Medicine of the University of Ottawa determines equivalences.

Language courses are not recognized towards the Humanities or Social Sciences prerequisites.

N.B. Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee admission.

Furthermore, in selecting students, the Admissions Committee reserves the right to assess, in the applicant’s program, the level of difficulty of completed courses and their relevance to future medical studies at the University of Ottawa; the Committee also considers the candidate’s results in these courses.

5. Queens University

source from http://meds.queensu.ca/education/undergraduate/prospective_students/academic_requirements

Academic Requirements

In order to qualify for the Queen’s Medical School, you need to have:

  • a minimum of 90 credits in any university program by the end of the academic year (September–April) in which application is made. (For further information, go to Credit Requirements)

The following academic requirements have been eliminated and will not be required starting with applications for admissions to the program in September 2013:

  • the equivalent of a full‑year university course in each of the following groups:

biological sciences (eg. anatomy, biochemistry, biology, botany, genetics, immunology, microbiology, physiology, zoology)

physical sciences (eg. general chemistry, geology, organic chemistry, physics);

humanities (eg. classics, English, French, foreign Languages, film studies, drama, music, history, philosophy, religion) OR social sciences (eg. anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, sociology)

With the elimination all prerequisite courses, applicants are able to select a program of study and courses which best meet the goals of their undergraduate degree program.  We do not recommend any particular course or degree program since no preference is given to applicants who have studied in any particular university program. Applicants are encouraged to consider all of the undergraduate programs available to them and to embark on the course of study in which they have the greatest interest and that would prepare them for an alternate career should they not gain a place in medicine.

  • All applicants are required to write the Medical College Admission Test prior to the deadline for submission of applications to OMSAS. (For further information, go to MCAT)
  • Candidates must be Canadian citizens or Canadian permanent residents (landed immigrants).  (For more information, go to Residency Requirement)

Engineering, Combined / Double Degree/Majors/Options

The list of interesting discussion forums:

1. University Of Western Ontario

Combined Degree Options
The combined degree program is similar to concurrent degree but is offered with one of Western’s professional Faculties: the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Richard Ivey School of Business, and Western Law. Combined programs with Western Engineering include:

  • The Richard Ivey School of Business with Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Software, Mechanical and Integrated Engineering (BESc and HBA)
  • The Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry with Biochemical, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical and Integrated Engineering (BESc and MD)
  • Western Law with Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Software, Mechanical and Integrated Engineering (BESc and JD)

MD/BESc Program

Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry together with the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Western Ontario offers a seven-year program leading to a Bachelor of Engineering Science degree and an MD degree. The program is aimed at high-achieving students and requires high admission performance standards. Combined studies in Engineering and Medicine prepare students for a career in technology-dependent medicine.

Three seats will be set aside each year for applicants to the MD/BESc Program.  Please note only applicants who are pre-registered in the MD/BESc program in the Faculty of Engineering at The University of Western Ontario are eligible for these seats. The combined program is available in conjunction with the Biochemical, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, and Integrated Engineering programs.

For further information, please visit the combined programs websites at

http://www.eng.uwo.ca/undergraduate/Chemical/BiochemicalwithMedicine.pdf

http://www.eng.uwo.ca/undergraduate/Civil/CivilandMedicine.pdf

http://www.eng.uwo.ca/undergraduate/Electrical/ElectricalwithMedicine.pdf

http://www.eng.uwo.ca/undergraduate/Integrated/IntegratedandMedicine.pdf

http://www.eng.uwo.ca/undergraduate/Mechanical/MechanicalandMedicine.pdf

2. Mcgill University

Major Computer Science and Biology

3. UOT

Skoll BASc/MBA Program

4. University of Waterloo

Engineering programs:

with program options eg life-science option

Bachelor of Computer Science Comparison

1. University of Toronto, St. George Campus, Bachelor of Computer Science, Degree Requirement

Computer Science Specialist (Science program)

Enrolment in this program requires the completion of 4.0 courses.

(12 full course equivalents [FCEs])

First year (2.5 FCEs):
NEW 1.  (CSC108H1, CSC148H1)/CSC150H1, CSC165H1/CSC240H1; (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1/MAT157Y1

 Second year (3.5 FCEs):
2. CSC207H1, CSC209H1, CSC236H1/CSC240H1, CSC258H1, CSC263H1/CSC265H1; MAT223H1/MAT240H1; STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1

Notes:
1. Students with a strong background in an object-oriented language such as Python, Java or C++ may omit CSC108H1 and proceed directly with CSC148H1. There is no need to replace the missing half-credit; however, please base your course choice on what you are ready to take, not on “saving” a half-credit.
2. CSC150H1 is an accelerated alternative to CSC108H1 and CSC148H1, intended for students with previous programming experience in a procedural language. If you take CSC150H1 instead of CSC108H1 and CSC148H1, you do not need to replace the missing half-credit; but please see Note 1.
3. CSC240H1 is an accelerated and enriched version of CSC165H1 plus CSC236H1, intended for students with a strong mathematical background, or who develop an interest after taking CSC165H1. If you take CSC240H1 without CSC165H1, there is no need to replace the missing half-credit; but please see Note 1.
4. Students may not omit CSC165H1 and proceed directly to CSC236H1. Either (CSC165H1 and CSC236H1), or CSC240H1 is required for program completion. CSC165H1 is different from CSC108H1 in this respect.
5. Consult the Undergraduate Office for advice about choosing among CSC108H1, CSC148H1, and CSC150H1, and between CSC165H1 and CSC240H1.

Later years (6 FCEs):
3.  CSC369H1, CSC373H1/CSC375H1
4.  1.5 FCEs from the following: any 400-level CSC course; BCB410H1, BCB420H1, BCB430Y1, with not more than 1.0 FCE from CSC490H1, CSC491H1, CSC494H1, CSC495H1, BCB430Y1
5.  1.5 additional FCEs from the following: any 300+level CSC course; BCB410H1, BCB420H1, BCB430Y1; ECE385H1, ECE489H1
6.  2 additional FCEs from the following list:
CSC: any 300-/400-level
BCB410H1, BCB420H1, BCB430Y1
ECE385H1, ECE489H1
MAT224H1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1, any 300-/400-level except MAT329H1, MAT390H1, MAT391H1
STA248H1/STA261H1, any 300-/400-level

The choices in 4, 5 and 6 must satisfy the requirement for an integrative, inquiry-based activity by completing one of the following half-courses: CSC404H1, CSC420H1, CSC454H1, CSC490H1, CSC491H1, CSC494H1, CSC495H1
This requirement may also be met by participating in the PEY (Professional Experience Year) program.

Choosing courses

This program offers considerable freedom to choose courses at the 300+level, and you are free to make those choices on your own. We are eager to offer guidance, however, and both our Undergraduate Office and individual faculty members are a rich source of advice.

We have also created a collection of what we call “concentrations”: sets of courses that direct you toward expertise in particular areas of Computer Science, such as game design, theory of computation, human-computer interaction, and many more. These concentrations are meant to help your choice, not to constrain it, and each concentration has at least one faculty member who would be happy to discuss it with you.

To read more about the concentrations, please consult our web site at http://web.cs.toronto.edu/program/ugrad.htm

2. McGill University, Computer Science

http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/undergraduate

3. University of Waterloo, Business Administration and Computer Science Double Degree, Degree Requirement

This double degree academic plan is administered jointly by the Faculty of Mathematics at the University of Waterloo (Waterloo) and the School of Business and Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University (Laurier). It is a restricted-enrolment plan with admission normally limited to Year One in a fall (September-to-December) term.

Students who successfully complete this plan will be eligible to attend both universities’ convocation ceremonies and be awarded a Waterloo Honours BCS degree and a Laurier Honours BBA degree from Wilfrid Laurier University at the respective convocations. Students may register for this plan at either university. The academic component is the same, regardless of where students are formally registered, but students participate in the co-op process at their home institution. Thus, the degree attached to each student’s registered university is a co-op degree, with the other university’s degree being a regular one.

This academic plan cannot be combined with any other major, minor, or option designation except as described in the notes below. It requires a minimum of ten full-time academic study terms and successful completion of a minimum of 52 one-term courses (26 units). These 52 courses (26 units) must include 24 specified courses (12 units) taken at Waterloo and 24 specified courses (12 units) at Laurier. The remaining four elective courses (two units) may be taken at either university.

For Waterloo-registered students, the co-op process involves four (or five at a student’s discretion) co-op work terms intermixed with study terms. The first of these work terms occurs during the May-to-August period between the second and third study terms. The complete sequencing of terms for Waterloo-registered students is listed in the Study/Work Sequence section. Students in this plan will be required to pay six co-op fees, which are usually assessed in the first three years of study.

For Laurier-registered students, the co-op process involves three (or four at a student’s discretion) co-op work terms intermixed with the ten study terms. The first of these work terms occurs during the January-to-April period between the third and fourth study terms. The earlier May-to-August period between the second and third study terms is an “off” term (where students are on their own for the term, similar to regular students). With the exception of this first May-to-August term being an “off” term rather than a co-op work term, the term sequencing for Laurier-registered students is identical to the one for Waterloo-registered students.

With the sequencing of study terms and work terms indicated above, the normal duration for this plan is four and two-thirds calendar years (or five calendar years at a student’s discretion). Only under especially mitigating circumstances, and with the approval of both universities, can the term sequencing attached to the double degree plan be altered, and such instances will usually result in a delay (possibly as much as one calendar year) of graduation date.

All double degree plan students, regardless of their home university affiliation, are required to satisfy all term-by-term progression requirements of both Waterloo’s Faculty of Mathematics and Laurier’s School of Business and Economics to remain eligible to continue in the plan, and to meet all graduation requirements of both institutions to be eligible for the two degrees. More specifically, students must ensure that their course selection each term, their academic performance level, and their academic conduct in general, comply with all the policies, procedures, regulations and requirements of both universities. Failure to do so will normally result in students being required to withdraw from the double degree plan. Such students may remain eligible to enrol in the (single-degree) Laurier BBA program (although not necessarily in co-op) or to enrol in another appropriate (single-degree) Waterloo BCS or BMath plan respectively, depending upon their individual circumstances.

In addition to satisfying all of the common degree requirements listed in Table I in “Degree Requirements,” students in this double degree plan must successfully complete all of the required courses specified below. Any questions or concerns about any of the overall BCS degree requirements or any of the specified courses should be directed to one of the plan’s academic advisors at Waterloo.

From Waterloo
One of

CS 115 Introduction to Computer Science 1
CS 135 Designing Functional Programs
CS 145 Designing Functional Programs (Advanced Level)

One of

CS 136 Elementary Algorithm Design and Data Abstraction
CS 146 Elementary Algorithm Design and Data Abstraction (Advanced Level)

All of

MATH 127 Calculus 1 for the Sciences or MATH 137 Calculus 1 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 147 Calculus 1 (Advanced Level)
MATH 128 Calculus 2 for the Sciences or MATH 138 Calculus 2 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 148 Calculus 2 (Advanced Level)
MATH 135 Algebra for Honours Mathematics or MATH 145 Algebra (Advanced Level)
MATH 136 Linear Algebra 1 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 146 Linear Algebra 1 (Advanced Level)
MATH 239 Introduction to Combinatorics or MATH 249 Introduction to Combinatorics (Advanced Level)
STAT 230 Probability or STAT 240 Probability (Advanced Level)
STAT 231 Statistics or STAT 241 Statistics (Advanced Level)
CO 250/CM340 Introduction to Optimization
CM 339/CS 341 Algorithms
CS 240 Data Structures and Data Management
CS 241 Foundations of Sequential Programs
CS 245 Logic and Computation
CS 246 Object-Oriented Software Development
CS 251 Computer Organization and Design
CS 350 Operating Systems
CS 490 Information Systems Management
CS 492 The Social Implications of Computing
ENGL 210F Genres of Business Communication

Four additional CS courses chosen from CS 340-398, 440-489, with at least two chosen from CS 440-489.

The selection of upper-year CS courses must include at least one course from each of at least two of the following area groups:

Systems and SE: CS 343, 349, 442, 444, 445, 446, 447, 450, 452, 454, 456, 457, 458
Applications: CS 348, 448, 473, 476, 482, 483, 486, 488
Mathematical Foundations of CS: CS 360, 365, 370, 371, 462, 466, 467, 475, 487

From Laurier
All of

BUS 111W Introduction to Business Organization
BUS 121W Functional Areas of the Organization
BUS 227W Introduction to Financial Accounting
BUS 231W Business Law
BUS 247W Managerial Accounting
BUS 288W Organizational Behaviour 1
BUS 352W Introduction to Marketing Management
BUS 354W Human Resources Management
BUS 362W Building and Managing Products, Services and Brands
BUS 383W Financial Management 1
BUS 385W Operations Management 1
BUS 393W Financial Management 2
BUS 395W Operations Management 2
BUS 398W Organizational Behaviour 2
BUS 481W Business Policy 1
BUS 491W Business Policy 2
ECON 120W Introduction to Microeconomics
ECON 140W Introduction to Macroeconomics
Note: See WLU calendar for above list of courses.

One of

ECON 250W Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis for Management
ECON 260W Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis for Management
Note: See WLU calendar for above list of courses.

Five additional 300- or 400- level BUS elective courses (2.5 units) taken in third, fourth or fifth year.

From Waterloo or Laurier
Four additional elective courses (2.0 units) are required. Students are free to choose their elective courses from either university.

Notes

  1. For details about the various Laurier Honours BBA policies, procedures, regulations, and requirements that apply to this double degree plan, please consult the Laurier Undergraduate Calendar and/or one of the plan’s academic advisors at Laurier.
  2. Students may, in certain circumstances, be permitted to have one minor or option designation on their Waterloo BCS diploma and transcript. Such a designation must be in a Waterloo discipline outside the areas of study offered by Waterloo’s Faculty of Mathematics and outside those offered by Laurier’s Department of Business, and it cannot duplicate a similar designation on the student’s Laurier academic record. In addition to the approval of the academic unit offering the minor or option, students require the approval of a double degree academic advisor from both Waterloo and Laurier to enrol for such a minor or option designation on their Waterloo academic record. Students wishing to have a minor, option, or specialization designation on their Laurier academic record should consult the Laurier Undergraduate Calendar for details and discuss their situation with an academic advisor from Laurier’s School of Business and Economics. Electing to have a separate minor, option, or specialization designation is not required for students in the double degree plan, and in some cases, satisfying the combined requirements for both the double degree plan and those for an extra designation may require successful completion of more than 52 courses.

4. University of Waterloo, Bachelor of Computer, Degree Requirement

This plan is subject to the common degree requirements in Table I in “Degree Requirements.”

One of

CS 115 Introduction to Computer Science 1
CS 135 Designing Functional Programs
CS 145 Designing Functional Programs (Advanced Level)

One of

CS 136 Elementary Algorithm Design and Data Abstraction
CS 146 Elementary Algorithm Design and Data Abstraction (Advanced Level)

All of

MATH 127 Calculus 1 for the Sciences or MATH 137 Calculus 1 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 147 Calculus 1 (Advanced Level)
MATH 128 Calculus 2 for the Sciences or MATH 138 Calculus 2 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 148 Calculus 2 (Advanced Level)
MATH 135 Algebra for Honours Mathematics or MATH 145 Algebra (Advanced Level)
MATH 136 Linear Algebra 1 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 146 Linear Algebra 1 (Advanced Level)
MATH 239 Introduction to Combinatorics or MATH 249 Introduction to Combinatorics (Advanced Level)
STAT 230 Probability or STAT 240 Probability (Advanced Level)
STAT 231 Statistics or STAT 241 Statistics (Advanced Level)
CM 339/CS 341 Algorithms
CS 240 Data Structures and Data Management
CS 241 Foundations of Sequential Programs
CS 245 Logic and Computation
CS 246 Object-Oriented Software Development
CS 251 Computer Organization and Design
CS 350 Operating Systems

Three additional CS courses chosen from CS 340-398, 440-489.

Two additional CS courses chosen from CS 440-489.

One additional course chosen from

CO 487/CM 432 Applied Cryptography
CM 461/STAT 440 Computational Inference
CS 440-498
CS 499T Honours Thesis
CS 600- or 700-level courses
(CS 600- or 700-level courses may be taken only if an equivalent 400-level course does not exist and special permission is obtained from the instructor and a CS undergraduate advisor. Courses in this list may be counted as CS 0.5 units.)

The selection of upper-year CS courses must include at least one course from each of at least two of the following area groups:

Systems and SE: CS 343, 349, 442, 444, 445, 446, 447, 450, 452, 454, 456, 457, 458
Applications: CS 348, 448, 473, 476, 482, 483, 486, 488
Mathematical Foundations of CS: CS 360, 365, 370, 371, 462, 466, 467, 475, 487

The 5.0 non-math units must either be used to satisfy requirements for a minor or a joint honours plan outside the Faculty of Mathematics, or must satisfy the following elective breadth and depth requirements. (Alternate plans must be approved by a CS advisor.)

Elective breadth requirements

1.0 units from the humanities (subjects from ARTS, CHINA, CLAS, CMW, CROAT, DAC, DRAMA, DUTCH, EASIA, ENGL, FINE, FR, GER, GRK, HIST, HUMSC, ITAL, ITALST, JAPAN, JS, KOREA, LAT, MUSIC, PHIL, POLSH, PORT, REES, RS, RUSS, SPAN, SPCOM, UKRAN)

1.0 units from the social sciences (subjects from AFM, ANTH, APPLS, BUS, ECON, GEOG, HRM, INTST, INTTS, ISS, LS, MSCI, NATST, PACS, PSCI, PSYCH, REC, SMF, SOC, SOCWK, SPD, STV, WS)

0.5 units from the pure sciences (subjects from BIOL, CHEM, EARTH, PHYS, SCI)

0.5 units from the pure and applied sciences (subjects from pure sciences plus ARCH, ENVS, ERS, GERON, HLTH, KIN, PLAN)
Note: No course can be used to satisfy more than one of the above requirements.

Elective depth requirements

1.5 units with the same subject, including at least 0.5 units at third-year level or higher
or
1.5 units with the same subject forming a prerequisite chain of length three

This plan is subject to the common degree requirements in Table I in “Degree Requirements.”

5. University of Waterloo, Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours Bioinformatics Option)

 

This decade has seen an exponential growth in the amount of genetic sequence and protein structure data available to biologists. These data have catalyzed a revolution in how biological and medical science is conducted in both academia and industry. However, due to the sheer volume and complexity of the data, modern computational techniques are required to store, manipulate, visualize, and explore it. Bioinformatics is the interdisciplinary area that applies the latest ideas of computer science to this wealth of new data to solve important biological problems, study the interactions of small molecules with biological receptors, and search for novel therapies for disease. It requires a sophisticated understanding of both the problem domain in biology and the appropriate analytical skills in computer science.

Although Bioinformatics is offered in both co-op and regular, it is intended primarily for co-op students. Regular students will not be able to follow a “traditional” term sequence and will definitely need to study in some spring terms.

In conjunction with common degree requirements in Table I in “Degree Requirements,” this plan requires at least 20 units including 1.0 lab units. To continue in any Bioinformatics plan, a student must satisfy the cumulative overall average requirement and cumulative major average requirement for Computer Science of 60%, as specified by the Faculty of Mathematics, and the cumulative major average requirement for Biology of 60%, as specified by the Faculty of Science.

One of

CS 115 Introduction to Computer Science 1
CS 135 Designing Functional Programs
CS 145 Designing Functional Programs (Advanced Level)

One of

CS 136 Elementary Algorithm Design and Data Abstraction
CS 146 Algorithm Design and Data Abstraction (Advanced Level)

All of

MATH 127 Calculus 1 for the Sciences or MATH 137 Calculus 1 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 147 Calculus 1 (Advanced Level)
MATH 128 Calculus 2 for the Sciences or MATH 138 Calculus 2 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 148 Calculus 2 (Advanced Level)
MATH 135 Algebra for Honours Mathematics or MATH 145 Algebra (Advanced Level)
MATH 136 Linear Algebra 1 for Honours Mathematics or MATH 146 Linear Algebra 1 (Advanced Level)
MATH 239 Introduction to Combinatorics or MATH 249 Introduction to Combinatorics (Advanced Level)
STAT 230 Probability or STAT 240 Probability (Advanced Level)
STAT 231 Statistics or STAT 241 Statistics (Advanced Level)
BIOL 130 Introductory Cell Biology
BIOL 130L Cell Biology Laboratory
BIOL 139 Genetics
BIOL 140 Fundamentals of Microbiology
BIOL 140L Microbiology Laboratory
BIOL 208 Analytical Methods in Molecular Biology
BIOL 250 Organismal and Evolutionary Ecology or BIOL 265 Diversity of Life
BIOL 308 Principles of Molecular Biology
BIOL 365 Resources in Bioinformatics
BIOL 465 Current Topics in Bioinformatics
CHEM 120 Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter
CHEM 120L Chemical Reaction Laboratory 1
CHEM 123 Chemical Reactions, Equilibria and Kinetics
CHEM 123L Chemical Reaction Laboratory 2
CHEM 237 Introductory Biochemistry
CHEM 266 Basic Organic Chemistry 1
CM 339/CS 341 Algorithms
CS 240 Data Structures and Data Management
CS 241 Foundations of Sequential Programs
CS 245 Logic and Computation
CS 246 Object-Oriented Software Development
CS 251 Computer Organization and Design
CS 482 Computational Techniques in Biological Sequence Analysis
CS 483 Computational Techniques in Structural Bioinformatics

Recommended courses

BIOL 331 Advanced Cell Biology
BIOL 342 Molecular Biotechnology 1
BIOL 359 Evolution
CHEM 333 Metabolism 1 (for students interested in Biochemistry)
STAT 333 Applied Probability

Note
A student can qualify for at most one of the following three degrees, regardless of which courses are taken.

Bachelor of Science (Honours Bioinformatics)

This plan requires fulfillment of the core requirements as listed above in Bioinformatics plus the following courses:

All of

BIOL 331 Advanced Cell Biology
BIOL 342 Molecular Biotechnology 1
BIOL 434 Human Molecular Genetics or a fourth-year Biochemistry course
CS 350 Operating Systems

Bachelor of Science (Honours Biology and Bioinformatics)

This plan requires fulfillment of the core requirements as listed above in Bioinformatics plus the following courses:

All of

BIOL 331 Advanced Cell Biology
BIOL 342 Molecular Biotechnology 1
BIOL 434 Human Molecular Genetics
Two additional third- or fourth-year Biology or Biochemistry courses.

Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours Bioinformatics Option)

This plan requires fulfillment of the core requirements as listed above in Bioinformatics plus the following courses:

All of

CS 350 Operating Systems

All of

Two additional courses from CS 340-398, 440-498, and one additional course from CS 440-498.
Note: At least one of these three courses must be from either the Systems and SE list or the Mathematical Foundations list for the Bachelor of Computer Science.

Recommended courses

CS 348 Introduction to Database Management
CS 486 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Notes

 

  1. Students in Bioinformatics may not claim a Biology minor with a BCS degree;
  2. Students in Bioinformatics may not claim a Computer Science minor with a Bachelor of Science degree.

University First Year

10 Secrets for University Success

10. Pick your major carefully. If your university doesn’t make you declare a major off the bat, don’t. Explore new things. Even if you must declare immediately, remember that you can always change your mind. Quiz people in programs you’re considering. Any regrets?

9. If you need help, ask for it. If you don’t understand something, ask your professor. Many will help you. Another place to find help is the library, where employees can show you how to format your citations or find articles in academic journals. If you’re ever accused of cheating, your student union can help explain your rights.

8. If you’re going to need an extension, ask early. If you ask early enough, many professors will grant extensions. But don’t annoy your prof by emailing and asking the night before it’s due.

7. Develop a rapport with your professors. Ask questions, contribute to the discussion, stay after class for a minute to clarify something that you don’t understand. In university, you’ll need to make some effort to get noticed. Professors who know and like you may help you find jobs, provide references for grad school and will say yes if you ask them to supervise your independent study.

6. Take care of your mental health. University is stressful, especially if you’re moving away from home for the first time. If you feel anxious or sad, don’t be ashamed to ask your friends for support. There’s also formal counselling from the school. Eating well and exercising can also help greatly.

5. Pick your roommates for second year carefully. Think about how you want to live. Your best friend won’t make the best roommate if he or she has different standards of cleanliness, a weird sleep schedule or a higher tolerance for noise. Talk about things like cleaning and splitting bills before you look for housing together. Read up on the laws before you sign a lease.

4. Get involved. If you’re in journalism, write for the school paper. If you’re in fine arts, get your work in student-run shows.  If you’re in business, enter case competitions. Participating in degree-related extracurriculars is a great way to network with future colleagues and learn new things.

3. Don’t bring your laptop to class. Sure, you can type faster than you can write by hand. But Facebook is pretty tempting when it’s in front of you. Plus, when you type your notes, you’re trying to take down every word, which means you’re not really thinking. The secret to success isn’t to take the most notes, but to take the most thoughtful notes. This is easier achieved on paper.

2. Know how to manage your money. Drinking every night doesn’t only lead to failing grades, it also leads to debt. Eating out, buying prepared food and getting takeout coffee can also impoverish you, so learn to cook. Keep track of your spending for a month, to see where you’re overspending.

1. Learn to manage your time. This is the most important skill for university. Most of your assignments probably won’t be that difficult, but they’ll take longer than anything you’ve done before. Assignments for different classes will often be due at the same time. If you have several essays due in the last week of the semester, you won’t get them all done unless you start early.

Generation Y

Documentary: Generation Boomerang from CBC Doc-Zone.

UOT Prof. Philip Oreopoulos: Why millenials aren’t getting jobs  and and What Gen Y can do to find work from Globe and Mail,  and his research Paper: The Short- and Long-Term Career Effects of  Graduating in a Recession: Hysteresis and Heterogeneity in the Market for College Graduates

Discussion: Agenda Summer 2010: The New Lost Generation from TVO.

Universities

Canada

(source from http://gencareershift.blogspot.com/)

If you’re a soon-to-be university graduate entering the workforce in Canada, you might be wondering how much salary you can expect to earn.  Our ongoing research suggests that you are probably over-estimating the salary that you are likely to earn in your first year.  To help you out, here are some data from the March 2011 Labour Force Survey.  The salaries given are the usual salaries of full-time employed Canadians aged 22-24 who have a university bachelor’s degree. (data courtesy of Statistics Canada).

 
Male
Female
Newfoundland
$40,932.70
$24,574.42
Prince Edward Island
$29,120.00
$30,081.25
Nova Scotia
$29,044.40
$33,047.14
New Brunswick
$35,974.17
$30,056.92
Québec
$44,346.07
$38,819.74
Ontario
$41,826.09
$36,448.27
Manitoba
$39,107.71
$31,111.84
Saskatchewan
$36,883.54
$40,561.91
Alberta
$39,736.67
$42,052.49
British Columbia
$28,634.54
$29,470.01

If you happen to live in one of the big 3 cities, you’ll fare a bit better in general:

 
 
Male
Female
Montreal
$42,391.73
$38,785.78
Toronto
$47,937.46
$35,646.61
Vancouver
$31,069.45
$30,496.87
Other CMA or Non-CMA
$37,409.02
$37,188.21

Ontario

The latest university graduates’ employment outcome survey  published by Council of Ontario Universities shows the following:

$98,333—Dentistry (100.0)
$92,667—Pharmacy (98.6)
$89,091—Optometry (100.0)
$72,452—Law (94.4)
$71,410—Veterinary Medicine (97.6)
$67,256—Medicine (99.3)
$62,865—Nursing (99.0)
$60,548—Engineering (94.9)
$58,587—Computer Science (95.8)
$56,117—Mathematics (91.6)
$53,643—Other Health Professions (93.9)
$52,276—Business and Commerce (94.9)
$50,760—Other Arts and Science (92.6)
$49,469—Average Graduate Salary
$47,857—Therapy and Rehabilitation (96.0)
$46,765—Education (95.8)
$45,427—Physical Sciences (93.7)
$45,104—Food Science and Nutrition (93.8)
$43,468—Social Sciences (92.5)
$42,181—Agricultural and Biological Sciences (89.9)
$43,571—Journalism (95.2)
$42,000—Forestry (100.0)
$41,667—Architecture and Landscape Architecture (96.4)
$38,407—Humanities (90.9)
$35,000—Theology (100.0)
$34,653—Fine and Applied Arts (93.5)

USA

In the research titled The Economic Value of College Majors, the following are the top 10 majors with the highest median earnings:

  1. Petroleum Engineer ($120,000)
  2. Pharmacy/pharmaceutical Sciences and Administration ($105,000)
  3. Mathematics and Computer Sciences ($98,000)
  4. Aerospace Engineering ($87,000)
  5. Chemical Engineering ($86,000)
  6. Electrical Engineering ($85,000)
  7. Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering ($82,000)
  8. Mechanical Engineering ($80,000)
  9. Metallurgical Engineering ($80,000)
  10. Mining and Mineral Engineering ($80,000)

The 10 majors with the lowest median earnings are:

  1. Counseling/Psychology ($29,000)
  2. Early Childhood Education ($36,000)
  3. Theology and Religious Vocations ($38,000)
  4. Human Services and Community Organizations ($38,000)
  5. Social Work ($39,000)
  6. Drama and Theater Arts ($40,000)
  7. Studio Arts ($40,000)
  8. Communication Disorders Sciences and Services ($40,000)
  9. Visual and Performing Arts ($40,000)
  10. Health and Medical Preparatory Programs ($40,000)

Set up a business

Step by Step Guide from Mary Bellis, About.com:

Lessons on Turning a New Invention Idea Into Money

Steps to Starting a Business in Canada

Registration

Starting a Business: Register a Business Name: It sounds very complicated, but in fact it can be easier than you do any online shopping.

Canada Revenue Agency: Business Registration Online: You only full name and social insurance number (SIN) as it appears on your income tax return, and your telephone number.

If you need a corporation, it is much more difficult for the process: How to Incorporate Your Business

Online Filing of Corporation in Canada (C$200): Corporations Canada

Action

Startup Weekend Toronto

Advices